At CMP, still had some brake cooling issues. Boiled my Super Blue one session  and had some pad fade on the next one.

I think several things contributed:

  • I didn’t do a fluid bleed after my last track event… probably wasn’t as fresh as it should be.
  • I was trying to get all the use I could out of an old set of Carbotech XP10’s… ran them down to 3-4mm. Thin pads transfer MUCH more heat to the pistons and fluid
  • The duct config wasn’t as effective at delivering air to the rotor bowl as it could be
  • After boiling the fluid, I drove like a newb the next session and drug the brakes far too much because I didn’t trust them
  • And it was 100F in the shade that day, on the toughest track on brakes that I run, with lots of high speed heavy braking and little cool down time.

Anyway, I’ve made some changes, hopefully to ensure no more of this brake foolishness.

Reworked the brake ducts, for much better air delivery to the rotor bowl.

The key component of this was the 6″ long 2.5″ aluminum joiner tube, from Amazon https://amzn.com/B014GXQI16

I cut this in half, and flattened the open end of each half.
Click the image to open in full size.
Click the image to open in full size.

Then cut a length of 1″ wide galvanized steel, ground it with a die grinder to fit around the wheel bearing assembly, and drilled to bolt it to the factory rotor shield holes. Bent to shape, drilled and bolted to the 2.5″ tube segment as shown.

Click the image to open in full size.
Click the image to open in full size.
Click the image to open in full size.
Click the image to open in full size.
Click the image to open in full size.

That should do it. Uses low-temp hose for most of the duct, only uses the high-temp silicone hose for the last 9″ or so near the rotors. You can “screw” together segments of this hose, then secure it with racer tape.

Also got a set of titanium brake pad shims from TCE (slip between the pads and pistons, and reduce heat transfer into the Pistons and fluid), and a liter of Castrol SRF fluid. Did a full brake and clutch flush with the SRF, including ABS bleed. We’ll see how the SRF holds up for the rest of this track season. Many folks report that they don’t need frequent bleeds when using SRF, since it has such a high wet boiling point.
Click the image to open in full size.

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